is widely considered the greatest chess player in history, but it was his historic match against IBM’s Deep Blue that cemented him as a household name. His loss became emblematic of humanity’s changing relationship with machines, computers, and information — especially artificial intelligence.

Kasparov tells the story of that match, and of the intellectual avenues down which it sent him, in a new book coming this May — and he’ll be on stage at to talk about his growing acceptance of machine learning as a complement to humanity, not an opponent.

As we move toward a world that is increasingly dependent on machine learning, Kasparov provides a unique perspective as Chess is one the first areas in which machine learning was thoroughly explored.

Kasparov is also a global human rights activist and has been outspoken when it comes to President of the Russian Federation, Vladimir Putin. Given the current political climate between Russia and the United States, we’ll be interested to hear Kasparov’s thoughts on today’s geopolitical landscape.

Alongside his role as Chairman of the Human Rights Foundation, he is also the author of two books, How Life Imitates Chess and Winter Is Coming (excluding his new book, Deep Thinking, coming out in May).

He is also a member of the executive advisory board of the Foundation for Responsible Robotics and a senior visiting fellow at the Oxford Martin School, focusing on human-machine decision-making.

Join us on May 17 in Manhattan as we explore the limits and limitless capacity of the human intellect, as well as our responsibility to use tools like artificial intelligence to improve our world, not just accelerate it.

Sponsors make TechCrunch Events possible. If you are interested in learning more about sponsorships with TechCrunch, shoot an email to .

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here